Its like a whole nother story

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I’m like watching TV and like nothing good is on so I’m all like when are they ever gonna put on a good show because I’m like really sick of watching these lame shows but I watch anyway and like my brain turns to mush and I’m like this is crazy, but I am crazy too but that’s like a whole nother story.

Is it just me or is this how people talk?

When I listen to how many times people use “like” in daily speech I cringe.  It actually hurts inside.

And then there is the phrase “whole nother”.

“A whole nother” is a commonly used phrase. It is a habit that people don’t even realize they are doing. The following is an example of the phrase being used in a sentence:

She is living in a whole nother world.

“Nother” is not a word. To correct this error, you could use “another,” “a whole other,” “a completely different,” “an entirely different,” etc.
Correct sentences:

She is living in an entirely different world.
She is living in another world.
So today I’m like quilting away and it’s like I can’t wait to be done so I can start a whole nother quilt. ( the picture above might be the next one)
Happy Quilting
Tim

32 thoughts on “Its like a whole nother story

  1. Kristen says:

    Oh Tim, you are my kindred nudge spirit!

  2. Ann says:

    I hear you, Tim! Well said!

    Another strange new word custom I have found is the following: When you are in a store and someone ( someone young) helps you find something, and you politely say “Thank you for helping me”.

    Their reply is this: “No problem”, when the answer I’d like to hear (and never will again, I suppose) is: “You’re welcome”. There. Why is it so hard to say that?

    “No problem” is mildly insulting, as if it really IS a problem, but they are graciously letting you off the hook for asking them to help you…..Sorry, my age is showing, I guess!

    Meanwhile, I love the new gingham top- so cheerful!!

  3. Sara says:

    Glad that you will be starting a whole nother quilt soon! :)

  4. Barbara says:

    And what about all the folks, including financial reporters, who start every other sentence with “I mean, you know …” “I mean” is as common as “like” and often combined with it. I mean, you know, I like cringe every time I hear myself say one of these annoying things. For sure.

    • timquilts says:

      exactly!!! the reporters can be the biggest offenders “I mean get a clue”…very irritating, I’m so glad that I am not the only one who is bothered by this stuff

    • antarabesque says:

      I think you must watch the same news feed we do. Maybe two/three years ago one of the anchors ended every other sentence with ‘for sure.’ Now almost all of them wrap up their contribution to the chatter portions of the ‘news’ with ‘for sure.’ I mentally ask, “Are you sure it’s for sure?”

  5. Vicki says:

    Oh, how I share your pain! And, I hate to hear people “ax” you something…although that could just be that I’ve lived in the Noo Yawyk region too long. (LOL!)

  6. Vicki says:

    Actually, ‘a whole nother’ might be pronounced ‘a whole nutter’ in this part of the woods.

  7. Karen says:

    LOL, manners and speaking correctly are no longer things that are taught well. Of course there is slang for every area that we live in region to region – I don’t hear “like” as often as you seem to Tim but I am not around a lot of young people anymore – one thing that bothers me though is going someplace to eat and it is always “hi guys what can I git chew” I can not recall how many places we go in it is always “hi guys”
    Love that quilt and would love to see the Michigan show with your quilt in it – I figure you are going and will love to see photos of the show!
    Karen

    • timquilts says:

      the younger people seem to be the worst offenders in the “like” here in Lansing…but I think calling everyone “guys” is universal…as if they consider it to be gender neutral…strange. I am going to the quilt show …it opens Wednesday….not sure about pictures. The AQS show rules say that you are allowed to take pictures but may not use them in a blog without the consent of the quilt maker and AQS…so likely no pictures, but I will write about it

    • antarabesque says:

      Worse than ‘hi guys…’ is ‘What can I get youz guys?” What is the implication of a double plural?

  8. Dolores says:

    Oh pulease don’t get me started. There/their/they’re are so many peeps out there that can’t talk or write – right?
    Gosh, I cringe when I hear the word peeps. Hubby uses it and it creeps me out.
    All done with the stripey quilt?

  9. CathiCathi says:

    I proofread and edit for a living and can’t believe how many seemingly educated people pepper their sentences with the like, you know form of punctuation. That, and those who, when relating conversations, will say things such as “and then I go”. Since when did go become a substitute for say or said?

    • timquilts says:

      I hear that frequently, I go and he goes in place of said. I wonder where that comes from
      I think that it says something about our educational systems in a rather sad way

  10. audrey says:

    What I get so amused about is when a sentence is started with the word ‘Honestly’. (‘Honestly, I just wanted to blah, blah blah.’) Here I am thinking that it’s good policy to be honest all of the time and now I’m wondering if there’s a time to be questioning that! The sad thing is? I find myself doing it occasionally too. Very cringe worthy….

  11. Byrd says:

    I think we never left the Valley Girl stage of the 80s. It’s like, Oh, MY god. Whatev-eerrrrrrrrr.

  12. The one that drives me crazy is, “know what I’m sayin’?”. In most cases, “no, I haven’t got a clue to what you’re trying to say.” And I also find “no problem” annoying. When I’m being served in a restaurant, of course I’m not a problem, I’m a customer! LOL

  13. Jose says:

    Hi, Tim. I am like, checking out your blog for like the very first time and like, I like it very much. This grammar post is hilarious! It’s funny because it’s, like, true.

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