Perfectionist? NO!

I have said many times in the past that I really don’t enjoy doing applique.   Why is that?   Too much pressure for perfection!    You might think that someone who does so much hand quilting has a lot of patience…but I don’t.    So many applique techniques that I have seen produce beautiful results and frankly I just can not imagine myself doing it.   Backbasting, freezer paper and starch with a mini iron etc, I just don’t have it in me to be that meticulous. I feel like I could have all the applique finished before I get that kind of prep done and I just get to anxious to get stitching.  I can’t follow the rules and I can’t be perfect….but it turns out that I can enjoy doing it my own way once I give myself permission to forego perfection.     That is also how I handle piecing and hand quilting….I get a lot done because I don’t put on the pressure of perfection.   That doesn’t mean that I don’t care or try to do a good job It does mean that I have made complete quilt tops without ever using a seam ripper, every point might not match but they work for me. Most of my had quilting is done by eye because I hate the tedious marking needed to be perfect.    I don’t enjoy the pressure that comes from trying to be perfect.  Quilting should be fun and for me that happens when I relax and let it happen.   (which doesn’t mean that can’t be fun for many, everyone is different and enjoys different things)

So that being said I am very happy with how my “just do it” needle turn applique is turning out.   click picture to enlarge

I posted about how I am doing it here https://timquilts.com/2015/12/07/tracing/

Happy quilting

Tim

31 thoughts on “Perfectionist? NO!

  1. Cheri says:

    I like your approach. I love doing needle turn appliqué, and I too want to avoid as much prep work as possible. I’m happy with an “organic” look. 😊 Your snow flake is gorgeous!

  2. Deb says:

    I’m perfectly fine with imperfections,I sure glad the years ago quilters didn’t give up because of imperfection. I think handmade means to be yourself , a unique person, something that is different from others. Your work is you and I enjoy it seeing it!

  3. Maureen Jackson says:

    Regional communication issue I guess but butcher paper is the same as freezer paper so why do you prefer pinning your paper cuts for tracing rather than using freezer paper for cutting and tracing? I know we get used to our own ways but I was just curious.

    >

    • timquilts says:

      OK….I never heard it called butcher paper……..If I could find it 48 inches wide I would have used it for this but the brown paper is inexpensive and comes in a roll that wide so I can fold and cut it and make the design in one piece ….for a smaller design I use freezer paper …

  4. Linda says:

    You are doing a great job, Tim. Finding our own way is what each of us should do 🙂

  5. Martha Caterino says:

    Needed new attitude of “just do it!”
    Finished is better than perfect.
    You are my favorite quilt blog…so down to earth!

  6. Sharron K. Evans says:

    You’re moving along! This is great to watch!

  7. katlorien says:

    It looks beautiful to me Tim. I do a lot of applique with starch and mini iron and people say it’s lovely but I wouldn’t have the patience, so I think what you say is right. I will be demonstrating to my group next year and I will tell them “just enjoy it, relax, don’t be too fussy”.
    Thanks!

  8. Pam G. says:

    I love your attitude & have learned from it. I’m getting more done by just doing it and not worrying about the ‘perfection’ part, what which a MAJOR hurdle for me. Snuggles to Teddy.

  9. Val Edwards (Wales, UK) says:

    Well done Tim – it just had to be said. Surely once a craft/skill/hobby stops being subjective the spontaneous creativity level (and joy) takes a plunge?? Guidelines and tips are very useful but shouldn’t become rules . Can’t remember where I read that perfection only exists in relative terms ! One of our girls was challenged daily by a tutor at Art college who criticized her interpretive achievements and ‘third eye’ as being less than perfect – where does that thinking come from?? I’m on your team – whatever works for you produces gorgeous results……..

  10. treadlemusic says:

    Totally agree. When it ceases to be a creative, relaxing enjoyable activity, I will move on!!!!!!! Love your applique!!!!!

  11. Linda says:

    Thanks for giving some of permission to not be perfect. LOL. I certainly am not perfect with anything I do. I just can’t be that anal/melancholy. I like to enjoy my projects (of course many people do truly enjoy doing the perfectionist thing and that is great – for them). I hate marking for quilting lines so I just do in the ditch which I only consider ok. I may try something without marking it, just once. 🙂

  12. Rhonda Casey says:

    I’m going to take this post and hang it on my wall. This is just the encouragement I need to get going on all my applique projects. Thanks!

  13. Craig says:

    Perfection is an illusion.

  14. Nancy says:

    Tim – I love applique, and have been doing it since the 80’s – even a mini Baltimore Album. My preferred way? Your way. Trace the shape on fabric with either a light or dark mechanical pencil, cut out with a little SA, and just needle turn. Anything else to me is just a waste of time. Your snowflake is MUCH bigger than it first seemed. Teddy was a good comparison!

  15. Annette Jacob says:

    Hey–you didn’t include Teddy :-(!!!!

  16. Susan says:

    I love your attitude: perfection is not only overrated, it is much less attractive than work that has the human touch. Keep up the good work and please keep on inspiring us.

Comments

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s