Using that Batting

Last time I posted about the batting I won….

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today I pin basted my Peppered Cotton top….

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I used the Dream Green batting and got a start on the quilting.

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I am machine quilting on the singer 127 Treadle machine.   I decided on machine because I have 3 other hand quilting projects going that I really need to finish before I start another ( I really will post about them soon)

I also bought another sewing machine cabinet today.

One of my early vintage machine purchases was this Elna (from about 1952-62)

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It is a really fun machine, I have it tuned up and running great , I have lots of decorative stitch cams to go with it and it sews a great stitch, but I hate to  sew with it.   The reason is that it is too high……I prefer to have the machine flush with the sewing surface the way they are in a cabinet.  Im just not a portable machine person.

The carry case for this machine does turn into a work surface like this

Elna_Supermatic_06 Elna_with_case

But it is too high off of the table for it to feel comfortable for me.

So I found a cabinet that will work.   It was designed for a Viking bit with a bit of a modification the elna will fit in the space

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Not bad for 26 dollars.  I actually spent a lot more than that for parts to rehab the machine.   I’ll be glad to be able to use it.

Teddy was more interested in his toy bone than anything I was doing today.

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But he reminded me that he gets Saturdays off.

Happy quilting

Tim

30 thoughts on “Using that Batting

  1. patty says:

    While you’re browsing antique stores, you might look for an antique sewing table. They are about 4 inches lower than a regular eating or end table, and might be just what you need for a machine like that, or any of your other vintage machines. Also, I’m surprised that the 1952 – 1962 machine had a free arm. I don’t remember those until the mid-sixties, but we didn’t have Elna where I grew up (Memphis, TN).

    • timquilts says:

      The elna is Swiss……they were way ahead of US manufacturers …..Singer made great machines but they really just “borrowed” their new ideas like free arm, drop feed dogs, reverse, zigzag, cams, from European manufacturers like Elna Pfaff, Brenina etc. So the US was always behind

  2. Ginney Camden says:

    That quilt is beautiful. Love those stripes. Your quilting design looks great.

  3. Carole S. says:

    You do that machine quilting like you were born to it. Amazing.

  4. pwest20 says:

    That is a really pretty cabinet!

  5. Joyce C says:

    Any idea how many functional machines you own?? My husband wants to know if Teddy is in a union to get Saturdays off!

  6. Mrs. Plum says:

    Pretty soon, Tim, you’ll be able to teach machine quilting. The quilting on your new piece looks fabulous!

  7. I’m amazed you have time to shop & find such great deals!

  8. Annie m. Perry says:

    I love seeing your beautiful quilting! How do you find time or maybe it’s creative energy? This time of year is tricky for me as I am a big gardener, I think I read on one of your post you are a floral designer, I used my floriculture degree for twenty years, loving every minute of the holiday rushes and the bread and butter work. The past ten years I have learned the field of dentistry, I love to learn as I presume you do also. Thank you for the inspiration of your beautiful quilting! Enjoy your day! And congratulations on your recent quilt entry.💐🌺🌸

    • timquilts says:

      Thanks…..I think it is mostly that I just get overwhelmed with ideas and need to do them….it always feels like I could do a lot more if there was more time…..snow again here so not out in the garden yet….but that will be soon I hope!

  9. Joannewilshanetsky@gmail.com says:

    Thank you for the happy little sloce of life.

  10. Carla says:

    Love what you did with the Peppered stripes. I am amazed by the machine quilting you are doing with your treadle.

  11. Pam G. says:

    The treadle quilting is amazing & beautiful. I have 2 Elna machines with cams from mid-60s – you inspire me to get one out and use it. Wish I could service my machines like you do – it gets costly taking them to the shop for maintenance. Also inspired to give my Free treadle machine a try. I bet Teddy is in a union – I’m sure his benefits are the best. Give him an ear scratch for me.

    • timquilts says:

      those old elnas get pretty rough when they havent been used for several years….they get a flat spot on the drive pulley and get super noisy…….I had to replace mine to make it usable …..You will love the Free…..it is such a smooth stitcher…..be liberal with the oil and run it without thread for several min to get it going if you havent used it in a while

      • Pam G. says:

        Thank you so much for the tips! I’ll pull out the Elnas and give them a spin. My grandson used one of them for a while until it needed repair, but I haven’t used them much since they were serviced. Gonna be a couple months before I can play with the treadle, but will let you know.

      • timquilts says:

        Have fun with it

  12. Barbara Rasch says:

    I am amazed that th out accomplish so much so quickly. Your new machine is great. Can’t wait to see how your going to quilt the quilt. Hi to Teddy.

  13. nellie1951 says:

    hi Tim, i,m going to be watching this elna update in cabinet ,because i have the same machine , maybe you can advice me with my sewing machine i cant get it to sew i hear motor running but foot don,t go up or down and wheel dose,nt turn to start sewing .thanks

  14. Linda Garcia says:

    I know I am behind in reading your blog so this comment is weeks behind. I learned to sew on an Elna just like that one. I have other old machines of my late mother’s, but she traded this one in when I was in high school for a new Viking. I have a Singer treadle with a coffin top from the 1800’s that belonged to her. I also have other treadles. I digress….
    My question is how are you going to get the knee control to function in that cabinet? I do not see a place for it in the front of the cabinet.

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